Stay Connected in the Field with Durable Rugged Laptop Computers

We live in a digital age where more and more work is being done on the go, from virtually anywhere, anytime. This is possible largely thanks to technology that laptops and smart devices that allow co-workers to connect from anywhere to complete projects. But what if you work in an industry where technology needs to stand up to more wear and tear than the average laptop has to overcome in, say, a quiet business office setting? In industries such as manufacturing, utilities, and the military, laptops and other smart devices are often exposed to outdoor or harsh environments. Because of this, many people who work in these fields use rugged laptop computers.

For those who may not know, rugged laptop computers are designed to withstand harsh environments. Additionally, they’re capable of standing up against sudden shocks, drops, and extreme weather conditions and temperatures so that whoever is using the laptop can continue working, unimpeded.

The idea behind rugged laptops arose when it became clear that billions of people use smart devices, including tablets and laptops, worldwide. In fact, an estimated 1.43 billion people worldwide use tablets. So the demand was there. Also, considering the fact that an estimated 61% of laptops exposed to harsh environments require repair by the end of their fifth year in use, its easy to see why people may prefer to use a fully rugged, more reliable laptop over a traditional laptop.

Having access to rugged laptop computers or even a semi-rugged laptop can also go a long way to ensuring your work won’t be interrupted. Consider this: when a single laptop stops working for a business, it may end up costing the business up to $47,000 once accounting for things like the cost of the laptop, management time, and support. Having rugged laptop computers, also known as toughbook laptop computers, businesses often enjoy their laptops for a longer period of time.

What do you think? Do you work in an industry or company that uses toughbooks? If so, how do they differ from laptops you’ve used in the past?

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